I experimented with my Iquitos tadpoles

Eggs, Tadpoles, Froglets
Frogopolis
Posts: 82
Joined: Sat May 17, 2014 5:02 pm
Location: Fresno, CA

I experimented with my Iquitos tadpoles

Postby Frogopolis » Thu Feb 26, 2015 10:41 pm

I normally leave the eggs and tadpoles inside the film canisters inside the enclosure where they were laid. After they've grown some I usually remove the tadpoles and put each one in its own 2 oz. deli cup with a lid that has several small holes drilled into it. Along with the tadpole I put in a piece of Indian Almond leaf, a little piece of Anacharis and a little piece of Java Moss. The only other food I offer them is Spirulina flakes that have been dusted with Seran Micron growth food. Every 3-4 days I change the water in the deli cups. The water I use is distilled water that has had an Indian Almond leave put into the gallon jug.

This is the way I have always done it for all my frogs. I've never had any problems with my tadpoles or froglets and they all grow to healthy adults.

Recently I decided to experiment. I keep three separate and unrelated groups of R. Amazonica "Iquitos". What I did was take six tadpoles from each enclosure and raised each group of six in its own container. These were Sterilite containers and are 6" long, 5" wide, and 3" inches tall.

Here is what's happened; All tadpoles are fine and healthy and I never observed any aggression or cannibalism. Here is the most important thing; The tadpoles are huge! Far bigger than the ones raised separately and they grew faster also. All the tadpoles were about the same age when I created the groups and they are all at the point where they are now getting their back legs. The coloring on their backs is also brighter and more pronounced.

Any ideas as to why they are bigger with more vibrant colors. By all accounts raising six together should have been a disaster.

Frogopolis
Posts: 82
Joined: Sat May 17, 2014 5:02 pm
Location: Fresno, CA

Re: I experimented with my Iquitos tadpoles

Postby Frogopolis » Sat Feb 28, 2015 3:52 pm

I thought I'd add something that was brought to my attention. A non-pet keeping friend was over a couple of days ago and while he looked over my menagerie I mentioned my Iquitos experiment. He pointed out something I didn't even think of - Since the beginning I have been keeping the three containers on the top shelf of my frog rack which is within a foot of the ceiling.

He told, "You know warm air rises?". I never even thought about that and maybe the increase in temperature may have had some affect in the tadpole's growth rate. It does get considerably warmer towards the ceiling although the air conditioning vent is on the other side of the room.

DianeCarter
Posts: 356
Joined: Sat Jun 16, 2012 1:06 pm
Location: Galena, Illinois

Re: I experimented with my Iquitos tadpoles

Postby DianeCarter » Tue Mar 03, 2015 1:29 am

I don't know about the Iquitos, specifically, but I do know as a rule, the warmer the tads, the quicker the morph. I had read this here on DD, but I also experienced it, with different frogs. I raised Imitators in viv, year round, and the warmer the tank, the quicker the morph. Then with my auratus, raised individually in cups in warm months, they morphed quickly but small. Healthy and lived, just started as smaller froglets. Then the big realization was with my communally raised cobalts from last summer. Eggs in summer, tads in fall. They just finally started morphing in January, my last one is morphing now!! The last one is huge, but still only has back legs. It hatched in the end of August, and is still in the water!! With this group that hatched in August, I haven't lost a single froglet--they are good sized, and very healthy and large. Just took longer than I would have ever imagined! I live in Illinois, ac in summer at 76 degrees, heat in winter at 68 degrees. That 8 degree difference resulted in monthes longer to finish morphing out--amazing, eh?
Pumilio bastimentos, R. benedictas, P. Terribilis orange, R. Imitator Cainarachi Valley, D. Leucomelas, D. Auratus, D. Azureus, P. vittatus, D. cobalts, D.Oyapok, Bombina Orientalis

Frogopolis
Posts: 82
Joined: Sat May 17, 2014 5:02 pm
Location: Fresno, CA

Re: I experimented with my Iquitos tadpoles

Postby Frogopolis » Fri Mar 13, 2015 2:24 am

DianeCarter wrote:I don't know about the Iquitos, specifically, but I do know as a rule, the warmer the tads, the quicker the morph. I had read this here on DD, but I also experienced it, with different frogs. I raised Imitators in viv, year round, and the warmer the tank, the quicker the morph. Then with my auratus, raised individually in cups in warm months, they morphed quickly but small. Healthy and lived, just started as smaller froglets. Then the big realization was with my communally raised cobalts from last summer. Eggs in summer, tads in fall. They just finally started morphing in January, my last one is morphing now!! The last one is huge, but still only has back legs. It hatched in the end of August, and is still in the water!! With this group that hatched in August, I haven't lost a single froglet--they are good sized, and very healthy and large. Just took longer than I would have ever imagined! I live in Illinois, ac in summer at 76 degrees, heat in winter at 68 degrees. That 8 degree difference resulted in monthes longer to finish morphing out--amazing, eh?


Thanks for sharing your experience. Raising Cobalts communally sounds interesting because as I remember Tinc tadpoles actually secrete some type of chemical that retards or stunts the growth of other tadpoles.

I have quite a few Iquitos tadpoles so I couldn't keep them as warm as I liked but they have been growing out fine and morphing with no problem. When I first tried to buying Iquitos it was hard to find them and when I did they were expensive so I thought I'd raise up some and make them available to people at a good price this season. I really like Iquitos. Besides being thumbnails they are hardy, active and always out and about, colorful(a lot of my adults are a blood-orange color), and are a perfect sized frog if you want to get a pair or trio inside a Exo Terra 12x12x18. I know a number of experienced breeders who keep four of them in this size enclosure.


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